We’ve assembled this list of useful resources and websites to support our carers, no matter what their caring roles.

Taking Care is a video library for carers to help them find their way on their caring journeys. Hear from carers and professionals as they share their thoughts and insights. You’ll find support on practical matters, understanding your emotions, and how to keep your own life in balance. Everyone’s journey is different but many of the experiences are common to all.

Positive Approaches to Support is a fantastic resource for families who are caring for children, young people and adults with a Learning Disability, Developmental difficulty and those who are Autistic.

You will find information about positive approaches for supporting your own wellbeing and supporting choice, independence and communication for your relative. You will also find information about how to support your relative if they display behaviours that challenge.

There is a mixture of reading material, videos and printable tools, with links to other resources and organisations. Everything has been created by experienced family carers and professionals working together.

The Five Ways to Wellbeing are a set of evidence-based public mental health messages aimed at improving the mental health and wellbeing of the whole population, developed by the New Economics Foundation. Read more about them and find other mental health support on the Mind website.

Age of Creativity work to enable more older people to take part in creative activities and enjoy improved health, wellbeing and quality of life. Their Festival has been postponed until May 2021, but they still want to engage the many older people who are now not leaving their homes and inspire them to do something new and creative from the comfort of their sofas.

To this end they have curated a range of online activities especially for older people and their carers, including activities for people in a care home setting and for people with dementia. There are also downloadable activity packs for those without digital access.

You may not be going to your favourite weekly exercise class in the gym or making a splash at the local swimming pool. But there are lots of ways you can enjoy being active. Activity Alliance have compiled a list of exercise advice, workouts, videos and activity guides to support disabled people. This helps everyone to move more while at home or when going outside for regular activity.

ChatterPack is a voluntary-run, special educational needs and disabilities hub. They have curated an extensive list of free, online, boredom-busting resources.