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Dementia

Caring for someone with dementia can be emotionally and physically demanding. Because everyone’s journey is different, we have developed a dementia wellbeing programme offering individual guidance and information to help you in your caring role. In order to qualify for this support, all you have to do is register with Carers Support West Sussex. Being a registered carer opens the door to a whole host of support ranging from emotional to financial assistance tailored to your needs.

Dementia Wellbeing Programme

Our Dementia Wellbeing Programme is designed to offer practical support and information to help you in your caring role. The programme offers you:

  • Group and one-to-one support
  • Dementia carer specific information
  • Access to a range of equipment
  • Workshops
  • Telephone Call-back Service
  • Other wellbeing support

Dementia Carers Online Support Groups

Meet and share with other dementia carers as well as take the opportunity for breakout sessions for further support with Carers Support West Sussex Dementia Team members,and representative from our partner organisations including Alzheimer's Society and Sage House.

Information and Support

Whether your loved one has been diagnosed with dementia or is displaying symptoms but has not yet been diagnosed, let us support you.

You can get one-to-one support by telephone or face-to-face. Contact us for more information about our Carer Assessments and support plans.

Support with finances

As a carer registered with us, you can apply for a grant from our Carer Health and Wellbeing Fund. We will help identify any concerns you have about your caring role, your goals, and how we may be able to help you achieve these. You may be entitled to certain benefits.

If you would like more information about any of these services, please call us on 0300 028 8888 or email info@carerssupport.org.uk

Equipment for Independence

Tips for caring for someone with Dementia

You can boost self-esteem, help to avoid depression and even improve sleep by encouraging your loved one to:

  • Stay active for both physical and mental wellbeing
  • Meet with other people as this can help with skills and memory
  • Make everyday tasks as simple as possible and allow plenty of time
  • Keep important items in the same place
  • Use visual aids, such as photos on cupboards showing the contents
  • Remove trip hazards
  • If the person gets up during the night, leave a light on
  • Talk about events or themes from the person’s past, using prompts such as photos, souvenirs or music

Useful Links

Sage House (Tangmere) Dementia Support is an exciting local charity working in partnership with voluntary and charitable organisations, the NHS, West Sussex County Council and other statutory organisations, to create a unique community hub for dementia. Designed to truly enhance the wellbeing and quality of life for local people living with dementia, their family and carers.

Alzheimer’s Society Their mission is to transform the landscape of dementia forever. Until the day we find a cure, they strive to create a society where those affected by dementia are supported and accepted, able to live in their community without fear or prejudice.

NHS Dementia Choices This site offers information for people with dementia and their families and friends. It aims to raise awareness of dementia, as well as help people create networks and better understand the impact of the condition. There are also links to lots of information on dementia and sources of local and national support.

Sussex Partnership Foundation Trust Information about local services from the county’s NHS Mental Health services.

Crossroads Care Crossroads Care South Central covers the counties of West Sussex and parts of Hampshire, offering a full range of flexible services for adults and children with various disabilities or health conditions. This includes Day, Evening and Night services, Self Funding services and Social Clubs.

Age UK Sussex Your one stop shop for advice and support across the county.

Admiral Nurses Admiral Nurses provide the specialist dementia support that families need. When things get challenging or difficult, their nurses work alongside people with dementia, and their families: giving them one-to-one support, expert guidance and practical solutions.

Know Dementia Telephone support, a visit to your home, time to talk, social activities through our ‘Moments’ sessions: Sporting Moments, Memory Moments Cafés, Green Moments and Musical Moments. Opportunities to meet others in the same position as you, advice on finance and care provision, training on how to cope with the diagnosis, help to set up a dementia friendly community.

Local Wellbeing Hubs The Wellbeing service can help you to find local wellbeing information and services. From this website to the teams in your local area, you can get advice and support on how to make small changes to improve your health and wellbeing, including how to stop smoking, how to become more active or how to make your meals healthier.

Burgess Hill Dementia Action Alliance

Chichester Dementia Action Alliance

Crawley Dementia Action Alliance

Haywards Heath Dementia Action Alliance

Horsham District Dementia Action Alliance

Bognor Dementia Action Alliance

Worthing Dementia Action Alliance

Dementia Adventure Dementia Adventure is a registered charity that is dedicated to supporting people to live well with dementia and have a sense of adventure in their lives. We believe in the benefits to be gained from regular, active engagement with the natural world.

Dementia Services Development Centre DSDC is an international centre of knowledge and expertise dedicated to improving the lives of people with dementia

Cognitive Stimulation TherapyCST is an intervention for people with dementia that offers a range of enjoyable, fun, activities providing general stimulation for thinking, concentration and memory, in a small group. It is aimed at general enhancement of cognitive and social functioning.

If you are worried about your own health we can refer you to the Carers Health Team, who work directly with carers and will develop individual strategies for each carer with an aim to reduce the strain of coping with their caring role. Find out more here.

Our Services

Dementia is a progressive condition characterised by a range of cognitive and behavioural symptoms.

What are the symptoms of Dementia that you need to be aware of as carer?

Dementia symptoms can include:

Memory loss

Problems with reasoning and communication

A change in personality

Reduced ability to carry out daily activities such as washing or dressing

Types of Dementia

There are many different types of dementia, each with its own characteristics and challenges. As a carer of someone with dementia, it is important for you to understand what you may encounter. Understanding how your loved one may be affected by their condition can help you to be prepared and get the support you need. See below for the more common types of dementia.


Different types of Dementia

Recognise the characteristics of different types of dementia to help you in your role as carer.

These are some of the more common types of dementia:


Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia that mostly affects people over 65. The onset is gradual, starting with memory loss of recent events. This progresses to the lack of ability to perform daily tasks, seemingly irrational behaviour and the inability to communicate. It is an irreversible progressive disorder with no known cure.


Vascular dementia (due to cerebrovascular disease)

Vascular dementia is a direct result of damage to the brain, occurring when there is a problem with the supply of blood to the brain. It is often caused by a specific event such as a stroke or can result from smaller blockages that may happen over a longer period of time.


Dementia with Lewy bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies is one of the most common types of dementia. It rarely affects anyone under 65 and is a gradual onset over a longer period of time. Memory issues are similar to those of Alzheimer’s, but symptoms may also include hallucinations and tremors, along with falls resulting from fainting episodes.


Mixed dementia

Mixed dementia is as the name suggests a condition that includes more than one type. The most common being Alzheimer’s and vascular disease. This is more common in those aged 75 years and over.


Frontotemporal dementia

Frontotemporal dementia is a disease that shrinks the brain at the frontal area affecting personality and behaviour in the first instance. It is commonly found in people in the age group 45-65 but in fewer cases has been present in anyone from 20 to 80.


Parkinson’s dementia

For many people dementia is a progressive element of Parkinson’s disease. Around 70% of people may go on to develop cognitive impairment over a period of time.

Carry on doing what you are doing. I found the service very supportive and informative

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i am enormously thankful and grateful for the timely professional and relevent support i have recieved from Carers support over a number of years

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excellent respectful service. I thought my personal concerns would be of no concequence. Understanding and showed real empathy with my situation

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Keep up the good service, it means a lot to us carers

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Just knowing you are the brings a huge relief, thank you

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